Volume 6, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 44-51
Maritime Labour Demand for LNG Carriers Operations in Nigeria: Augmented Trend Analysis
Nwokedi Theophilus Chinonyerem, Department of Maritime Management Technology, School of Management Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Okafor Cajethan Onyedikachi, Department of Maritime Management Technology, School of Management Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Hussani Yusuf Kodo, Department of Transport Management, Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida University, Lapai, Niger State, Nigeria
Johnson Mathew Ndubuisi, Center for Logistics and Transport, University of Port-Harcourt, Port-Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
Gbasibo Lawrence Addah, Department of Maritime Management Technology, School of Management Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Received: Mar. 28, 2020;       Accepted: Apr. 16, 2020;       Published: May 11, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijtet.20200602.12      View  255      Downloads  76
Abstract
The study analyzed the maritime labour demand for LNG carriers operations in Nigeria using augmented trend analysis. The objectives of the study among other things were to estimate the demand for maritime labour for LNG carriers operations in Nigeria and to estimate the instantaneous rates of change (IROC) as well as the average rate of change (AROC) for maritime labour demand for LNG carriers operations in Nigeria between 1998 –2016. Historical design approach was adopted and data on maritime labour demand (Dml) and tonnages of seaborne LNG trade between 1998 -2016 were sourced from the annual statistical reports of the Nigeria Liquefied Natural Gas (NLNG) company and Nigeria Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) 2017 editions, covering a period of 19years. The data obtained was analyzed using trend analysis augmented by rate of change and derivative functions from the theory of differentiation. It was found that there exists a significant decrease in the trend of demand for maritime labour for LNG carriers over the years covered in the study. The instantaneous rates of change of demand for maritime labour for LNG carrier per annum over the period was not constant as it showed being driven by the significant relationship between the demand for maritime labour for LNG carriers operations and growth in tonnages of seaborne LNG export trade. It was recommended among other things that to stop the current practice where almost half of the vessels serving the shipping needs of the NLNG are owned and management by foreign ship management companies who employ foreign maritime labour; the management of all LNG vessels serving the shipping needs of the NLNG must be handled by NLNG Ship Management Limited (NSML).
Keywords
Maritime-Labour, Demand, LNG-Carriers, Nigeria
To cite this article
Nwokedi Theophilus Chinonyerem, Okafor Cajethan Onyedikachi, Hussani Yusuf Kodo, Johnson Mathew Ndubuisi, Gbasibo Lawrence Addah, Maritime Labour Demand for LNG Carriers Operations in Nigeria: Augmented Trend Analysis, International Journal of Transportation Engineering and Technology. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2020, pp. 44-51. doi: 10.11648/j.ijtet.20200602.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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