Volume 5, Issue 2, June 2019, Page: 30-42
Investigating the Relationship Between Workability and Water Absorption of Periwinkle Shell Ash Cement Concrete
Eme Dennis Budu, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Ohwerhi Kelly Erhiferhi, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Received: Jul. 2, 2019;       Accepted: Jul. 31, 2019;       Published: Aug. 14, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijtet.20190502.12      View  116      Downloads  20
Abstract
In this paper, a comprehensive study on the relationship between workability in form of slump and water absorption, a permeability and durability property, of cement concrete blended with periwinkle shell ash is presented. Periwinkle shell ash was obtained from the granulation process of calcined periwinkle shells at a calcination temperature of 800°C. Concrete specimens were designed using the Scheffe’s simplex lattice theory. Standard experimental procedures using the slump height method was adopted in the determination of workability of concrete specimens. The water absorption of hardened concrete specimens was also determined from standard experimental procedures. Regression models of different forms; power, linear, logarithmic, exponential and polynomial forms were developed to correlate both properties using results from trial mixes. These models were subjected to validation tests using results from control mixes through F-Statistics. The models were also subjected to R2 analysis for further adequacy tests. Results obtained from this study revealed that although the 0.5 power model proved adequate, little correlation exist between both responses as illustrated from low R2 values obtained for all the models developed. It was therefore recommended that in models’ validations, adequacy tests be used in conjunction with verification test (R2 test) to prove the usefulness of such models’ and that the relationship between other PSA cement concrete properties be investigated.
Keywords
Workability, Water Absorption, Periwinkle Shell Ash, Scheffe’s Simplex Lattice
To cite this article
Eme Dennis Budu, Ohwerhi Kelly Erhiferhi, Investigating the Relationship Between Workability and Water Absorption of Periwinkle Shell Ash Cement Concrete, International Journal of Transportation Engineering and Technology. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2019, pp. 30-42. doi: 10.11648/j.ijtet.20190502.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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